Author Archives: Alex English

About Alex English

Originally from Athens, Georgia, Alex is currently a third-year, joint-degree candidate at Vermont Law School, by way of Baltimore/Washington, DC. Prior to law school, he taught English as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Bulgaria (2007-2009). This past summer, he worked as a student intern at the District Department of the Environment, working on DC's Total Maximum Daily Load consolidation plan and issues surrounding implementation of the District's new Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) Permit. He's hoping to return to DC after graduation to work on water quality, environmental policy and environmental justice. In the meantime, he's working with the Environmental Law Center to publish an article on stormwater regulation in light of recent updates to the Clean Water Act. In his free time, he indulges in alchemy; turning water into beer. He may be reached at aenglish@vermontlaw.edu

A Dam Shame – Reservoirs and Elevated Mercury Levels

One of the oldest forms of “renewable” energy comes from hydropower. From ancient grain mills to tanneries to hydroelectric generation, humanity has long harnessed the power of flowing water. Unfortunately, increased use of water power has corresponded with increased environmental impacts. Tanneries, … Continue reading

Posted in bioaccumulation, drinking water, environmental health, fish consumption advisories, food contamination, mercury, public health, Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA), risk communication, routes of exposure, vulnerable populations | Comments Off on A Dam Shame – Reservoirs and Elevated Mercury Levels

Dead in the Water

Thanks to laws such as the Clean Water Act, and the Safe Drinking Water Act, tremendous progress has occurred in the past forty years: the Cuyahoga River no longer catches fire, Boston Harbor is generally free of fecal matter, and municipal water … Continue reading

Posted in agriculture, agriculture and human health, algal blooms, Clean Water Act, climate change and health, cyanobacteria, dead zones, drinking water, environmental health, NIH, nonpoint source pollution, phosphorus, public health, routes of exposure, Safe Drinking Water Act, vulnerable populations, water quality standards | Comments Off on Dead in the Water

The Sky is Falling: Stormwater as a Vector for Environmental Health Hazards

We have known for years that rainwater can carry hazardous substances which affect the health of human and animal life. The classic example is acid rain. Burning coal and other fossil fuels produces sulfur dioxide (SO2), which various nitrogen oxides (NOx) … Continue reading

Posted in agriculture and human health, bioaccumulation, carcinogens, Clean Water Act, cyanobacteria, DDT, drinking water, environmental health, fish consumption advisories, food contamination, mercury, public health, routes of exposure, Safe Drinking Water Act, synthetic chemicals, water quality standards | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on The Sky is Falling: Stormwater as a Vector for Environmental Health Hazards